Cyber Monday Race Deals

Who doesn’t love a deal?  My two favorite days of the year for scoring a race registration discount?  National Running Day, which takes place annually in June, and CYBER MONDAY!!!

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I am not a shopper, so Black Friday means nothing to me other than the best day of the year to avoid crowds.  But Cyber Monday, now, I can get into that!  Deals, specials, discounts on everything from carpeting to compression socks, Hi Res TV’s to running shoes, and best of all?  Race discounts!!

Many race directors take advantage of this special online buying day to offer up one-day-only deals off race registration.  It’s simply one of the best days of the year to sign up for your next race, your next marathon, your next destination race weekend.

So get ready!  I know of a few races that are planning big discounts.  Discounts too good to pass up!  So, keep your eyes on Facebook and Twitter come Monday, and get to Googling first thing in the morning scouring the internet for those deals!

Happy Cyber Shopping!

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In Honor of Dad

My Dad and I live States away, and have for 16 years now.  Not a day goes by that I don’t think of him, and especially on Father’s Day I appreciate all he has given me.

My Dad has always been so supportive, and most of my life it has been from afar.  It’s been almost two years now since my boys and I flew up to NY to visit him.

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I will always cherish that photo!  My Dad is now 80 years old, and still lives by himself in a humble house high on the top of a hill in the town where I was born.  His roots are there, and even though none of his kids live there anymore and haven’t for years and years, he is still content to stay put.  We don’t see each other that much because of distance, but when we talk he always asks about the kids, my work and my running.

Because of his interest in seeing us run, we found a race to run in NY when we visited a few years back. He cheered us all on from the side of the road, and was there at the finish.  He really enjoyed it.

When I told him that my brother and I were going to be running the NYC marathon this year, he was all excited.  I told him I was raising money for charity so that I would have the chance to run it.  He kicked in $100 donation to the cause, which was so appreciated.  For an 80 year old man living on a tight, fixed income, this was a huge gesture!

I made a promise to my Dad, that if I raised my $3,000 minimum goal, and got to run the race, that I would drive up to his house personally, and drive him to NYC for the race.  (He lives about three hours away from the City). That’s a 10 hour drive to pick him up, and another three to my brothers house in Jersey.  My Dad will be there to watch us run!  I couldn’t be happier about that.

I still need plenty of donations if I am going to run NYC though.  I am nearing the halfway mark, and every dollar counts.  Won’t you please consider a donation to the James Blake Foundation which raises money for cancer research?

The following link will take you directly to my fundraising page on Crowdrise.

A thousand thanks!  And Happy Father’s Day to all you Dad’s out there today!

Hilton Head Island Marathon 2015- Race Recap

An absolute whirlwind the past few days have been.  I am still pretty exhausted, but hope to catch up with myself over the course of today and tomorrow.  With the race being on Saturday, I have now had a bit of time to soak it in, so here goes with the story of marathon #17…….

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We left home on Friday, February 6th just before 1pm.  Heading down to Hilton Head from here takes about five hours.  The weather was a bit chilly, but really nice for a drive.  Sunshine and thankfully traffic on Interstate 95 was not all that bad.  The drive down was uneventful.  My son had his headphones on for most of it, so I got to switch my XM channels back and forth between 70’s and 80’s music and CNN.  It was a very relaxing drive.

We got to Hilton Head right on schedule, and drove straight to packet pick up at the Westin Resort in Port Royal Plantation.  This being the first time I have ever run a marathon a second time, I knew that the packet pick up would only take minutes.  I was right!  No muss no fuss.  Into the line, and had my bib, shirt and various freebies in less than two minutes.  My son Colton, got into his line for the 5K, and had his stuff in moments, as well.  There really isn’t much to see at this expo.  A very few vendors, and the only thing I needed was five packets of GU, so thankfully the Palmetto Running Company could fulfill my one and only purchasing need.  We double checked our bib chips to make sure they worked, and we headed out.  The drive from the Westin to my Mother’s house is less than five minutes, so before we knew it we were pulling into the driveway.

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A nice reunion with Mom was followed by a relaxing evening at the house.  We settled in, and had a few snacks as she prepared a dinner of chicken marinara and pasta.  A great pre-race home cooked meal, complete with a salad and garlic bread.  Perfect!  Race morning would come fairly early, so I wasn’t long for the world that evening.  We mapped out our plan for the morning, and we headed off to bed.

I don’t now about you, but it’s especially sweet to be at a destination race, and be able to stay with family.  This doesn’t happen often, but enjoying the comforts of a home while away at a race is very nice.  Thanks Mom!

My alarm went off at 5am.  I had been fairly nervous leading up to this race being my first race in over three months.  I was actually fairly calm when I woke up after a really good sleep.  I made coffee and sat on the deck while it brewed.  The forecast had been perfect.  It was about 38 degrees when I got up, but it was supposed to warm up to about 40 by 8am when the race was to start.  The eventual high for the day was to be about 63.  No clouds, only sunshine.  Couldn’t ask for better.  As I sat with my coffee I was remembering last year at the race.  My performance had been sort of lackluster.  The weather was lackluster with rain, clouds and wind.  This year would be different I kept telling myself.

Mom lives very close to where the race starts, so we didn’t leave the house until 7:15.  Such a huge bonus, this really makes this race worthwhile for me.  There have been times for other races where I have had to leave the house three hours before the start.  45 minutes for this one.  Unheard of!  Before we knew it we were at Jarvis Creek Park, and getting ready to line up.

We have our jackets to Mom who would be there to watch the finish of Colton’s 5k before they headed back to the house for a while before coming back to watch my finish.  The morning was perfect!  Not a cloud in the sky.

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Such a beautiful setting for a race!

After snapping a few selfies, we spotted this woman wearing a shirt I had not seen before.  Hum…  Interesting choice.  Not sure if her butt ran fast or not.

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Promptly at 8am, the air horn sounded and we were off.  I remembered going out a bit too fast last year, so I didn’t want to make the same mistake this year.  We purposely started back a ways but found it annoying to have to weave around slow pokes that had no business being lined up where they were.  It never fails.  I need to publish a runner courtesy handbook so that everyone that races understands proper etiquette.  I encourage all types of runners to race but please, if you walk, or have a pace of 10, 11, 12 or more minutes per mile, you have no business lining up with a 8 or 9 minutes per mile pacer.  You just don’t.

The 5k, Half and Full courses are identical for the first two miles or so, so I knew I would at least be able to see my son for the first bit of the race.  He was in front of me for about a mile and a half before I caught up to him.  I didn’t feel like I was running too fast, but from behind him, he looked like he was just running too casually.  He looked slow.  When I finally caught him, I urged him to speed up.  He pulled off his headphones and told me that he had turned his ankle on a curb trying to get around someone, and that he was in pain.  Knowing he only had about a mile to go, I told him to just give it his best, and ice it after the finish.  I knew my Mom was at the finish and could tend to him if he needed help, so as confidently as I could I passed him.  We had agreed that he would text me his finish time once they got back to the house.  I had to wait.

The marathon course is mostly flat, but has four passes over a fairly substantial bridge over Broad Creek.  Heading into mile 5 is the first crossing.  I felt good going up and over the bridge the first time.  The course changed a bit this year, and the next two miles seemed a bit different to me.  There was actually one spot where we were on a wooded trail.  They had done a nice job of highlighting tree roots on the path with white spray paint.  Otherwise this could have been a very tricky part of the race with proper footing.

At this point in the race I really felt pretty comfortable.  My breathing was good, I wasn’t cold and I felt like I was maintaining a very consistent pace.  Most of the time when I race I switch my Garmin screen view to “pace view” right after the start.  This time I left my Garmin on “overall time”, or elapsed time the entire race except for once.  I toggled over to see my pace at about mile 7 to make sure I wasn’t overdoing it too early in the race.  I was on track.  Under 8 minutes per mile, I don’t remember exactly, but pace felt comfortable.  With a few turns, we were back on the Cross Island Parkway and about to make a second pass over the bridge.

Another successful pass up and over the bridge between miles seven and eight brought us to the point in the course where turned off the parkway and headed out toward Spanish Wells.  I remembered that last year between miles 9 and 10 that it started raining my mood dropped as well as my pace.  I vowed to myself that this wouldn’t happen again.  I felt strong.  I enjoyed the scenery, the live oak trees, the Spanish moss hanging from the trees.  Beautiful, huge homes.  Occasionally island residents would be out in their driveways cheering on runners, but mostly they were still in bed, I think.  It was quiet.  Peaceful.  A beautiful morning for a run, and I was enjoying it.

I passed the first timing mat at mile 11.  Crossing at 1:27:54, for an overall pace of 7:59.  I was right on track.  As nervous as I was heading into this race about not feeling prepared, my body was holding up.  Just a few miles later though I started to feel some pain in the top of my right foot.  A familiar pain.  A few years ago I fractured a metatarsal in a car accident, and the pain was just like it.  Maybe I tied my shoe too tight.  Maybe the tongue of the shoe twisted somehow.  I wasn’t sure, but it was very annoying.  I stopped quickly at a water station to adjust it, but it just didn’t work.  The pain was there, and would stay with me the rest of the race.  I just had to try to forget about it and run through the pain.  I knew it was not something that I would have to quit the race over, but it was concerning.

The half way point came and went.  Aside from my right foot all was going well.  I checked my Garmin at 13.1.  My time was 1:43-ish.  I thought to myself “this is going too well”.  Right on track.  My spirits were still in good shape, and I chatted with almost every runner that I past.  I remember thinking somewhere in here that I was surprised I hadn’t heard from my son yet.  Why hadn’t he texted me yet?  I started thinking things like is he really hurt?  Maybe he is in the medical tent having his ankle wrapped.  I was worrying.  Then a few minutes later a “ding” on my phone.  This is what I saw as I drew my phone up to my eyes.  “2nd place age group”.  Wow!  Now I know why it took so long to hear from him.  He placed in his age group and had to wait around for the medal ceremony.  Worth the wait, I’d say!  I wrote “awesome!”, to which he replied “got a medal”.  Then he wrote that he was about to ice his ankle.  He asked me where I was, to which I responded, “mile 14”.

Knowing that all was good with him, I got back to focusing on my race.  Oh, by the way, for those of you who haven’t tried it, it’s really quite amusing to try to text back and forth while running a marathon.  We had agreed before the race that I would let him know via text when I hit mile 20, so that he and my Mom could head back to the park to watch me finish.  My focus was now on the next five miles.  Another trail-type section came up at mile 15.5 as we made our way through a field in Honey Horn.  Another new part of the course with some uneven footing, you really had to concentrate on foot strikes here.  It was a cool change from last year.

The next few miles put us back on the Cross Island Parkway.  Miles 16-18 were tough for me last year, so I knew I had a battle in front of me.  It is a boring straight section.  No spectators, straight into the sun, knowing the third pass over the bridge was looming in the distance.  I tried very hard to focus, but knew my pace was dropping off some.  I was tired.  I was not hot, but I needed some water and had two miles to go before another water stop.  My attitude could have really sucked here, but I repeated my race mantra in my head, “the heat is on”, and started to think of a friend of mine.  The night before the race I read a post on Facebook from a friend of mine in my childhood.  We haven’t had any contact whatsoever since Junior High School, but became friends on Facebook a few years ago because we are both runners.  He posted on Friday night that he had some terrible injuries to his knee through years of playing soccer, running and competing as a triathlete.  I had known this prior and he had some pretty major surgeries to try to fix his knee so that he could once again do what he loved.  He stated in his post that he would never win a marathon, or triathlon but at least wanted to get back to the sports that made his life complete.  That he endured the harsh surgeries and recovery so that he could once again play soccer with his young son, to run around the yard with his daughter, to race again one day.  He had gotten news from his Doctor and physical therapist that day that he was cleared to start running again.  I could sense his relief and joy in his post.  At this darker moment in the race I began to think of him, and to run, not walk for him.  To use his words as encouragement.  To dedicate these next two tough miles to him and his recovery.  It helped me through.  Tim, those tough miles were for you, my friend!  And thank you for inspiring me!

Before I knew it, I hydrated up, and hit the bridge at mile 19.  Here is the one and only photo I took during the race.

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That was my view from the bridge.

I texted that picture to my son along with the words “I Hate Bridge”.  Makes me laugh to read that now, and it perfectly describes how I felt at the time.  Coming off the bridge, miles 19-22 were and out and back through Point Comfort.  Another beautiful area on the island.  More importantly it meant that my final pass over the bridge at mile 22 was coming up.  I crossed the 20 mile timing mat at 2:47:09, again texting my son so they could head toward the finish.  I knew it would take me about an hour from the twenty mile mat to get to the finish.  My overall pace now was standing at 8:21.  Not bad, I thought.

I had to walk a bit up the bridge that last time at mile 22.  Losing time, of course, but it couldn’t be helped.  I just couldn’t manage to run it faster than I could walk it.  So I chose my spots on the uphill, and speed walked twice for about 20 seconds.  I told myself this was the only break I would allow myself to secure a strong finish.

I hit mile 23, done with that bridge for the final time.  It should be smooth, flat and comfortable until the end.  Then it happened!  Out of nowhere, my right foot big toe locked into the straight position.  It cramped up completely.  I had to stop to stretch it out.  I had to get it bending again so that I could run.  It was amazingly uncomfortable and very disheartening.  I had so few miles left to go and now this.  I was discouraged.  I got it going again, and started running although I was not confident at all that it wouldn’t cramp up again.  About a half mile later it happened again.  I stopped, stretched, and started running again.  What a pain, literally!  Must have been my hydration, no other way to explain it.  I thought I managed well, but I must have been a bit dehydrated.  Damn it!  Well, I got that toe to move one last time and made my way to the finish.  I didn’t have to stop again, and just before the mile 26 mark, we veered off the road onto the path around the pond at the park.  The final quarter mile was quiet, no one in front of me, and no one behind me.  Just a serene view of the water, and the finish line on the opposite side.  I knew my son and mother would be there to greet me.

Making the final approach to the finish, a few cheers here and there sprinkled in I saw them.  There they were, waiting for me!  Crossing the line in 3:46:53.  They both had two cups of water for me, which I downed immediately.  The medal draped around my neck, we walked gingerly away from the finisher chute.  I did it!  The last few miles weren’t altogether pretty, but I managed yet another marathon finish.

I really was happy with how I did overall.  We all talked, and caught up.  We walked over to the timing tent to enter my bib number, and this totally shocked me!

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What?  I placed second in my age group?  At a marathon?  OMG!!!  I finished 38th overall, too!  Wow!  I was shocked!

Instead of just grabbing a slice of pizza and heading to the car, winning an additional award meant we had to stay awhile for the ceremony.  So, we walked back to the car to change clothes before heading back to the park.  We found a nice sunny spot and relaxed.  We listened to some music, ate some food and just soaked in the experience.  What a great day!  My son and I both own age group medals, so we couldn’t have asked for a much better day.

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Hilton Head is not only the first marathon I have now run twice, but I may now have to go back for a threepeat.

An interesting factoid about this race….  Hilton Head is a vacation destination mainly, even though my mom lives there.  People vacation there to enjoy the beaches, the golf, the tennis.  The weather!  A lot of residents do participate in races there, but looking at the finisher list in the marathon, one thing is quite clear.  The Hilton Head Marathon is truly a destination race.  The top 10 finishers in the marathon all came from different states.  In order, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Tennessee, Georgia, New Jersey, District of Columbia, Maryland and California.  How cool is that?

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And how cool is it that I walk away from Hilton Head in 2015 with two medals, not just one?

Holiday Wishes

The holidays are upon us, and I wanted to make sure to send a very special wish for peace this season to all of you.

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No matter what you believe in or what religion you practice, take the time to enjoy the season with your friends and family and remember what is important to you in life.

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If you happen to have been good this year, you may have a present or two under the tree.  The runner in us all hopes you get some new shoes, shorts or tech shirts.  Some new socks, a Garmin, maybe a race entry.

I hope the New Year brings you a shiny new PR!

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Happy Holidays from our house to yours, wherever you may be on the map.  See you on the road!

December Update -Health? Wealth? Wise?

Just a quick update today, as today is my last day off until Christmas.  So little time left before the big day, and so much to do.

I actually just wrapped the first gift, of the many I have in the pile to do today.  That alone is an accomplishment just days before Christmas.  I am no a big preparer for the holiday, and never have things like shopping and wrapping done early.  I always have good intentions, but it never happens.

December is a time to celebrate our blessings, but let me tell you, This December has also been filled with curses for me.  I started to get sick two weeks ago yesterday, and remain ill.  Finally getting better, but it has indeed been a huge struggle.  I thought I was on the mend about a week into my illness, but then it took a terrible turn for the worse which put me in Urgent Care this week.  I finally got a diagnosis of pneumonia, and sinus infection coupled with bronchitis.  Don’t you know I have felt great over the past two weeks?  Yep, not really.  It has been one of the worst sicknesses I have ever had, and during the month of December when work is at it’s peak in physical demands, it has been really hard.

Obviously it has impacted my December running goals, and have only been out on the pavement seven times.  Racking up about 30 miles doesn’t really cut it when it comes to trying to regain my fitness and move toward that first marathon on 2015 in Feveuary.  I remain confident though in my ability to bounce back, and definitely have experience on my side when it comes to training.

So, it has been a rough month health wise.  Wealthy and wise?  I am surely not wealthy, but have had the opportunity to fine tune some creative skills this past month.  No judgements here please, but I am going to share a few photos with you of some of my creations.  I work in an environment where a multitude of skills are required at times.  Being in management, if someone on my team is out of commission, I need to step up to the plate and get his or her job done.  Look at some of the things I had to create over the past few weeks.

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Floral arrangements are not my forte.  Again, these were created out of necessity for customer orders.  All of the work is my own, and it made me proud to have completely satisfied customers.  Being able to show a creative side at work has been a huge plus on the wealth side this month.  Not monetarily, but self satisfaction.

As far as being wise?  As we head into a new year, I can say that yes, I have grown.  I have become more wise at work, dealing with staff and customers.  I have become a better friend, manager, brother, father and son.  I am better at maintaining relationships, through all life lessons learned.  I reflect more, and give myself time to think before reacting.  A lot of this I have learned through running.  I have learned these lessons about running, and during my runs.  Running gives me a lot of time to reflect, to contemplate, to relax.  It is a soothing activity for my soul, and I believe that I am a better person all around because of it.  My passion for running has certainly had amazing positive impacts on my life that go way beyond the medal placed around my neck at the finish line.  For this I am forever grateful and wiser for.

My Runner’s Christmas List

Funny that I’ve heard the calliope music of ice cream trucks the last two days, because isn’t this the cold season?  Isn’t this the time to bundle up on the couch in a nice warm house, watching the snowfall outside?  Maybe your in a place on the map like me, where it doesn’t snow that often, or at all.  Maybe you can get outside all year, and run to your hearts content.  I know I do.

As the Chsitmas season comes on full force, I am forced to come up with a list, because after all, you-know-who will be checking that list, not once but twice.  Santa Claus!  What could a junkie runner want that’s worthy of jotting down on a wish list for Santa?  A few things come to mind…..

1.  Another new pair of running shoes.  Asics Cumulus size 9.5 please.

2.  I dreadfully need new running shorts, because all the vinegar in the world can’t take the stink out of the ones I currently own.  And not just one pair of 5-7 inch inseam running shorts, how about 5 or 6 pairs Santa?

3.  Entry fees into a Half dozen marathons for 2015.  A can name quite a few off hand, and if you need websites, Santa, just let me know.

4.  A check to cover my travel expenses to places like Colorado, Chicago, NYC, etc., for my mini racecations next year.

5.  A new Garmin…. One with all the bells and whistles…. One that will work consistently for more than a year, please.

And finally…. The big one Santa!  The one I really want more than any other gift this Christmas.  If you must forego on #’s 1-5 due to the expense, I understand, but if you do, you must bring me #6.

6.  Please, please, please……..

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City of Oaks Rex Healthcare Half Marathon – Race Recap

I had the most incredible day yesterday at one of our local races.  The Raleigh City of Oaks Marathon and Rex Healthcare Half Marathon is an extremely popular and well attended race here in central North Carolina.  The Old Reliable 10k is also run, and is just as popular.

Huge medal with a spinning acorn in the center.

Huge medal with a spinning acorn in the center.

I ran the Half with both of my sons.  For me, this race was my 24th Half Marathon.  For my 18 year old son, his 3rd Half.  For my 16 year old son, his FIRST!  So, yeah, it was a pretty big day for all of us.  I had been looking forward to this race for months and months.  I actually signed up when registration opened many months ago.  Back then, February, my older son had just run his first Half.  Due to sibling rivalry, my younger son who was 15 at the time went out a few days after that race and ran 13.1 miles.  Why?  His brother had just done it, and he wanted to prove that he could do it, too.  I asked him if he would ever want to run a race at the distance, to which he responded, of course.  I signed him up just before his Birthday in April.  He would have over six months to wait, and train.  My older son decided a few months later that he wanted to run it, as well.

With varying degrees of training, as the race neared we were all excited.  I am a very lucky man.  To run a Half Marathon with both of my sons was going to be epic!  I wasn’t able to even attend the race expo this year because I worked both days.  My oldest, who is a student at NC State, location of the race expo, picked up all of our race bags.

So, with all of our stuff laid out for race morning we hit the hay on Saturday night.  Colton and I woke up early on Sunday, but the drive to the race is not really that far.  Just 20 miles to a parking lot at nearby Cameron Village.  We were to meet up with my son Dylan at 6:30am at the NC State Belltower.  The weather here in NC had just taken a turn this week.  With a cold front coming out of Canada, our race morning was extremely chilly.  And windy!  Race morning temps in the mid 30’s, rising to near 50 for a high.  The wind made it feel bone chilling at times, but it really was to be great conditions overall for a race.

We met up at 6:30, for the 7am start.

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All three of us warmed up, stretched and talked about our goals for the race.  I was aiming for a sub 1:45, Dylan and Colton both wanted to go sub 2.  I knew Dylan could do it, as both of his previous Halves were sub 2, but Colton would be the wildcard.  He is a dedicated sportsman, and stubborn like myself, I trusted that he would finish.  Due to his soccer season at school though, he just didn’t properly train, and because of that I just didn’t know what to expect from him.  As any runners knows, proper training is key, and race day can bring a wide range of results.  I was excited for all of us.

At about 6:45 the three of us made up way into the starting chute.  We decided that we would start together near the 1:45:00 pacer, and just see what happened once the race began.  Part of me was calm and content.  The part of me that was just going to enjoy the experience of running with my kids.  The Dad in me was nervous though, for both of them.  The starting line is quite the sight to see.  Right next to the Bell Tower on Hillsborough Rd., runners filled the street, and spectators were everywhere.  As all three races line up together the crowd was a big one.

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As the gun went off we made our way down Hillsborough.  The three of us stuck pretty close to one another for the first half mile.  Dylan went out in front as we traversed Ashe Ave., and Colton just just behind me heading up and then down the first hill of the course.  Not sure why I don’t have a crick in my neck today, because I kept turned to see where Colton was, while straining my neck to keep my eyes on Dylan up ahead.  A straightaway down Western Blvd., I overtook Dylan when I finally caught a good pace groove.  We were running at a pace of about 7:30 at the time.  Heading into the center of the city for a quick loop, I knew that the first really big hill test was coming up at mile 4.  At this point Dylan and Colton were behind me, and I couldn’t find them in the sea of runners anymore.

Boylan Rd. is a tough uphill section of the course. Up until mile four my right foot (which I have had trouble with lately) felt fine.  Going up this hill that all changed.  All of the sudden the pain was back.  The top of my right foot.  It almost feels like I have a stress fracture in one of my metatarsals.  It really annoyed me, and slowed me down.  As I crested the hill, my overall pace was 7:42.  I made it my goal to try to get through the next four mile section through the city, and not let that pace slip any more.  I knew that rolling hills from miles 8 to 11 would find me losing time, and knowing I wanted to finish under 1:45:00, I couldn’t afford to lose precious time during the relatively flat section through the city.  Winding through the city is always fun, but with each change in direction the wind would come at you from different directions.  Down Morgan, then Martin and finally north on Wilmington St. toward the Capitol Building.  The drumline is always a motivator!!

Running back toward Hillsborough I crossed the timing mat at the 10k split.  48:32.  Not bad!  I had lost a bit of pace in the city, but with an aching foot, I wasn’t complaining.  Out toward Glenwood Ave. S the real fun begins.  Down, the up, then down and back up for the next four miles.  Really an undulating section of the course, it will really bite you in the ass if you aren’t prepared.  I was hanging in there.  I stopped for water near mile 9.  The only time during the race that I took any hydration at all.

My mind was all over the place during this race.  A bunch of times I looked over my shoulder to see if I could locate my kids, but never could.  I found myself hoping they were having good races.  Part of me wanted to stop on the side of the course and let them catch up.  I had thoughts of my younger son getting a calf cramp on a hill and having to drop out of the race.  I had thoughts of Dylan doubled over throwing up in the bushes.  It was nerves.  Fatherly nerves.  I remained optimistic that they weren’t far behind me, and several times thought at some point during the later sections of the race that one or both would tap me on the shoulder, say hello, and then run on past me.  I knew that just beyond mile 11 would be and out and back section, when I would get a look at who was behind me for about a half mile.  As it approached, it gave me energy, knowing that I may see them.

My pacing was still good.  If I could keep it up, I would hit my goal.  I hit mile 11 at 7:55 pace overall.  I knew I could maintain it over the final two miles.  I made the turn at mile 11.6 and quickly affixed my eyes on the runners on the other side of the road.  My eyes were peeled!  A few minutes after the turn, A huge smile on my face as I spotted Colton!  I cheered him along.  Gave him two thumbs up!  I calmed down a bit.  He looked strong.  Then a few more minutes passed, and I spotted Dylan.  He saw me as well, and was pointing at his back, and shaking his head back and forth as if to say “my back is hurting, this isn’t my best but I’m doing it”.  There we all were, within five minutes if each other, making our way down the final stretch of the course back to the finish at the Bell Tower.

I was ecstatic!  What a fun way to end a race.  Lots of spectators, cheering and the finish line was approaching.  I knew that I would have to wait in the finishers chute to see both of them finish.  I crossed the line, hitting my goal.  I quickly had the race medal placed around my neck, caught my breath, and tried to find a spot on the side where I could have a view of finishers behind me.  Just a few minutes later I could see Colton approaching the finish of his first Half Marathon.  It was pure joy to watch him cross the line.  As he walked toward me a volunteer laced his medal around his neck and a big smile emerged on his face.  I gave him a huge tight hug!  He had done it.  In record time, I thought.  I was so proud.

It was now time to move out of the way of other runners.  We found a good spot, and cheered Dylan on as he then finished a few minutes later.  All of us done, all of us under two hours.  I couldn’t have been prouder.  Giving Dylan a huge hug and fist bump, we all gathered our finishers shirts, and found a place to relax on the hill.  We were all immediately freezing.  The wind was whipping around, and because we were all wet from sweat, every time the sun went behind a wispy cloud, the shivering began.

We gathered for photos, ate some food and tried to warm up in the sun.  Priceless moments in time that I will always remember.  I am so happy that I can share this wonderful sport with my sons.  It truly is a gift.  This one was all about family, and I was in my glory.

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Many, many thanks to all of the race volunteers.  Our hometown race is spectacular year after year.  Yes, the race is not easy or flat, but it’s ours.  Last year I ran the Full, and to this day it’s still my PR.  The Half this year, was my fastest half of 2014.  Not a PR, but a personal best for 2014.  Here are our official results.

There were 2,132 runners in the Half.  Overall I placed 233, Colton 329, and Dylan 414.

Our finish times:

Dad: 1:43:58.    Colton:  1:47:27.    Dylan:  1:51:01.

I finished 27th out of 160 in my Age Group.  Colton finished 20th and Dylan 23rd in their AG’s.

Pretty amazing!  Very proud!  Quite satisfied.  It was another amazing year at the City of Oaks.

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Vacation Request

I made a really big mistake this Summer.  All good intentions behind it, but it ended up being an error.  Back in the early Spring, as my kids were winding down their school years, I imagined a nice Summer trip to the beach for us.  Maybe the Outer Banks, Wrightsville Beach, Myrtle or Hilton Head.  A great idea that went up in smoke.

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Due to a busy work schedule, and an even busier social schedule for my sons, our vacation never happened.  As Summer approached we had graduations, a few races, parties, yada, yada yada.  You know how that goes.  All of the sudden my oldest now is in college, and my youngest is starting 11th grade on Monday of next week.  We didn’t make the time, or make it a priority.  Something happened.  

So, as a result, I have not been on vacation since March.  Far too long!  I am in crazy need of some time off. Luckily, that time is soon to be here.  Without the kids, finally vacation looms just around the corner.

Officially just 9 days away now, I am chomping at the bit to get the hell out of here.  I have spent the Summer working hard, and training hard.  It’s time for a well deserved break from the madness.

Thankfully Fall will be filled with some much needed time off, play time, relaxing time, and races galore.  First up is a trip to Vegas.  I like to go at least twice a year.  Looking forward, let me tell you.  Once back from Vegas, a few days of work, then my trip to Utah for Big Cottonwood Marathon.  From there, the Smoky Mountains for a long weekend.  A local race at the start of October, then a monumental trip to Chicago for a little thing called a marathon.  It will certainly be a whirlwind six weeks ahead, and I SO need it!

Did you get to enjoy a Summer vacation this year?  Where did you go and what did you see?  Maybe your stories will tide me over during my lengthy nine day stretch at work I am starting today.  You see, my next day off is vacation on August 30th.